The quality of the air we breathe isn’t something the average New Zealander has cause to think about. We’re clean and green right? Not always.

The truth is not all air is created equal.

Closed up for the day or night, with little opportunity to let the fresh outside air in, most modern homes can play host to moist, stale air. The Building Code recommends 35% of the air in your home is replaced every hour while lived in. The common way to achieve this in most homes is to open your windows and doors to let out the stale, moist and polluted air and replace with fresh air. Doing this, however, means you lose valuable heat (or cool air) and it may cause a security problem. Understandably, there are many times when this is not a practical option.

Some homes use a common “Positive Pressure” ventilation system that sees low quality air from the roof cavity circulated throughout the home. These systems do not meet the Building Code requirements as the air pumped in isn’t fresh air.

By using a Balanced Ventilation system with Heat Recovery technology from Premier Air, fresh air is supplied to the house while not losing valuable heat. It can also work as a dehumidifier drying the air in your home to reduce condensation and mould. A Balanced Ventilation system bypasses inferior roof air altogether.

What’s wrong with Positive Pressure Systems? People buy these systems to reduce their ‘crying windows’ but can end up with ‘crying buildings’ instead. Not only can they force valuable heat out of the house, but they can push moisture into the materials of the building. Positive Pressure systems do not meet Clause G4 of the Building Code. They push air down from the roof cavity, potentially carrying with it impurities, contaminants and dust particles.
The experts (1) are concerned at the potential spread of fire and smoke hazards by these systems and stress Positive Pressure systems should not be promoted for their heating or cooling properties. (1) ‘Heating and cooling potential of roof space air: implications for ventilation systems.’ Report by Department of Physics, University of Otago. Prepared for the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Autority (EECA) May 2011, p2

Ventilation Systems Compared Passive Ventilation Positive Pressure Ventilation Premier air balanced ventilation
Ventilation Method
Features Open Windows Air pumped from roof space Ventilation with a heat exchanger
Fresh air in Some no yes
Stale air extracted Some no yes
True heat recovery no no yes
Safety (no open windows) no yes yes
Avoids contaminants or smoke in roof yes no yes
Moisture not forced into walls or ceilings yes no yes
Meets building code clause G4 Possibly no yes
Supply air is filtered no yes yes

Ventilation Systems Compared Passive Ventilation

Ventilation Method
Features Open Windows Air pumped from roof space Ventilation with a heat exchanger
Fresh air in Some no yes
Stale air extracted Some no yes
True heat recovery no no yes
Safety (no open windows) no yes yes
Avoids contaminants or smoke in roof yes no yes
Moisture not forced into walls or ceilings yes no yes
Meets building code clause G4 Possibly no yes
Supply air is filtered no yes yes

  • Premier Air combines the health of outdoor air with the comfort of indoor air.
  • Premier Air delivers fresh air from outside while transferring warmth
  • Indoor air pollutants are ranked among the top fiver environmental risks to public health¹
  • Outdoor air is seven more times polluted than indoor air in many existing homes, and up to 100 times cleaner than the air in new homes²
  • Children are highly prone to air pollution because they breathe a greater volume of air relative to their body weight²
  • Premier is low in odours, pollutants, mould spores, bacteria, dust and asthma triggers
  • With Premier Air you can literally breath easy!

1. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) www.epa.gov/region1/communities/indoorair.html

2. BRANZ ‘Build’ Oct/Nov 2008, p57

Here’s how it works

The Premier Air handling unit extracts the stale, moist air from the home like a dehumidifier via a concealed ducted system.

The air passes through a heat exchanger, transfers and retains the heat, and then expels the stale air outside.

Fresh air from the outside is drawn in and passed through the heat exchanger, which warms it from the saved heat of the outgoing air, then distributes it through to the living rooms and bedrooms.

Air Units

Here’s how it works

The Premier Air handling unit extracts the stale, moist air from the home like a dehumidifier via a concealed ducted system.

The air passes through a heat exchanger, transfers and retains the heat, and then expels the stale air outside.

Fresh air from the outside is drawn in and passed through the heat exchanger, which warms it from the saved heat of the outgoing air, then distributes it through to the living rooms and bedrooms.

In the example above the outside temperature is 10 degrees.

Without a Premier Air unit, fresh air let into the home through open windows would need to be heated by 12 degrees to achieve a comfortable 22 degrees.

With a Premier Air unit, the fresh air would only need to be heated by 3 degrees – by far more energy efficient. Premier Air ventilation systems meet clause G4 of the New Zealand Building Code.

View Spec sheet

Air Units

In the example above the outside temperature is 10 degrees.

Without a Premier Air unit, fresh air let into the home through open windows would need to be heated by 12 degrees to achieve a comfortable 22 degrees.

With a Premier Air unit, the fresh air would only need to be heated by 3 degrees – by far more energy efficient. Premier Air ventilation systems meet clause G4 of the New Zealand Building Code.

View Spec sheet